§ 51.

DEFINITION OF “WILD AND POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS ANIMAL”

For purposes of Sections 50 through 66, a wild and potentially dangerous animal is defined as an animal which is wild by nature and not customarily domesticated in the City and County of San Francisco and which, because of its size, disposition, or other characteristics could constitute a danger to human life or property. Such wild and potentially dangerous animals shall be deemed to include:

I. Class Mammilia

A) Order Carnivora

1. Family Candidae (dog), excepting Canis Familiaris (domestic dog), and including but not limited to such members as the wolf, the coyote and the jackal.

2. Family Felidae (cat), including but not limited to such members as the tiger, the jaguar, the leopard, the lion and the cougar, excepting Felix Catus.

3. Family Hyenidae (hyena).

4. Family Ursidae (bear).

B) Order Probscidea (elephant).

C) Order Primata (primates), including but not limited to the chimpanzee, the baboon, the orangutan, the gibbon, and the gorilla, excepting the Family Hominidae (man).

D) Order Artiodactyla, even-toed hoofed mammals, excluding the domesticated species of the Family Suidae (domestic pig) and Family Bovidae (cattle, sheep, goats).

E) Order Perissodactyla, odd-toed hoofed mammals, excluding the domesticated species of the Family Equidae (horses, donkeys, etc.)

II. Class Reptillia

A) Order Squamata

1. Sub-Order Serpentes, all front and rear fanged venomous snakes and all species of the Families Boidae and Pythonidae.

2. Sub-Order Lacertilia, both venomous species of the Family Helodermatidae (Gila monster and Mexican beaded lizard).

B) Order Crocodilia (crocodile and alligator).

III. Any other species of the animal kingdom (as opposed to vegetable or mineral) which is venomous to human beings whether its venom is transmitted by bite, sting, touch or other means, except the honey-producing bee.

History

(Added by Ord. 81-78, App. 2/10/78)

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